We’re already planning for Park[ing] Day 2011 (see our 2009 ‘park’ below)

World Streets: The New Mobility Agenda: The Journal of Sustainable Transport Policy & Practice

PARK(ing) Day in Cape Town (Not everybody loves it equally)
By Gail Jennings

A few weeks back, a local police vehicle – which had been circling for a while – came to abrupt halt on a no-stopping line in front of me in Fish Hoek, and asked if my colleagues and I had permission to be in our parking bay*. The nearby businesses were complaining, you see; by occupying our bay, they said, we were preventing others from doing so, and this meant, no doubt, that their daily takings would suffer.

The other 60% suffer for quite the opposite reason: they don’t need a parking bay, they rely on public transport, which currently is unreliable, unintegrated, unsafe, unaffordable, inaccessible, unsustainable, and just plain unpleasant. And it’s not even public transport, come to think of it – it’s commuter transport, workwards in the morning, homewards in the evening, and little flexibility in-between…

To read the rest of the story, click here.

PARK(ing) Day is a annual open-source global event where citizens, artists and activists collaborate to temporarily transform metered parking spaces into “PARK(ing)” spaces: temporary public places. The project began in 2005 when Rebar, a San Francisco art and design studio, converted a single metered parking space into a temporary public park in downtown San Francisco. Since 2005, PARK(ing) Day has evolved into a global movement, with organizations and individuals (operating independently of Rebar but following an established set of guidelines) creating new forms of temporary public space in urban contexts around the world. It’s about providing temporary public open space . . . one parking spot at at time.

The mission of PARK(ing) Day is to call attention to the need for more urban open space, to generate critical debate around how public space is created and allocated, and to improve the quality of urban human habitat … at least until the meter runs out!..

To find out more about Park[ing] day, visit parkingday.org or http://my.parkingday.org and join the Cape Town group (if you’re in Cape Town, of course…) or join the Cape Town Park[ing] Day 2011 event on Facebook.

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