Peaceful streets in Irene – one of the few ‘woonerven’ in South Africa

For the residents of Irene Village, outside Tshwane, it wasn’t enough to simply complain about fast, dangerous residential streets, or long for a safer neighbourhood. Instead, they had their villlage officially declared a place for people.

In terms of the Road Traffic Act 93 of 1996, Sign R403 [the Woonerf sign] indicates to the driver of a vehicle that, if he or she proceeds beyond such sign he or she shall – (a) not enter the area driving a vehicle with a gross vehicle mass exceeding 3500kg or a vehicle with more than 10 seats for passengers, except for local access or delivery; (b) yield right-of-way to pedestrians and children who may be in the roadway; (c) observe a maximum speed limit of 30km per hour unless another speed limit is indicated by a road sign; and (d) not enter the area by vehicle and drive through the area to exit at another point or the same point without breaking the journey [ie, no-one may use the area as a thoroughfare] -© Gail Jennings – mobility magazine.

To download a pdf of the full story, click Peaceful Streets in Irene – www.mobilitymagazine.co.za.

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